Getting artsy with graphical abstracts for scientific journals

Scientific journals are trying to make their papers more appealing by creating a whole spectrum of research summaries including graphical abstracts, video abstracts, and plain language summaries. Here, I will focus on graphical abstracts since I’m about to design one for my very first paper published. I’ve been looking for examples of graphical abstracts on…

The importance of spontaneous brain activity

Our brain reminds me of New York City: a place that never sleeps. There’s always something going on in our brains even when we are asleep or not paying attention. I invite you to watch the 5.min lesson on “How spontaneous brain activity keeps you alive” by Nathan S. Jacobs to know more about this topic….

The meaningfulness of effect sizes in the social and behavioural sciences

Today I jointd the seminar on “The meaningfulness of effect sizes in the social and behavioural sciences in light of the reproducibility crisis” given by Thomas Schäfer, a Professor for Quantitative Research Methods at MSB Medical School Berlin. Here’s the abstract of the seminar: ABSTRACT: Effect sizes are the currency of the social and behavioral sciences….

Can neuroscience help us understand art?

Neuroaesthetics is a term that has been invented to refer to the project of studying art using the methods of neuroscience, and over the years has become a hot research field. It is not unusual for scientists and theorists of art to collaborate on papers that find their way into top scientific journals. But, how these two disciplines…

Decoding the neural processing of speech

I’ve recently crossed paths with this video of the NCS2020 ″Decoding the neural processing of speech” talk by Tobias Reichenbach, PhD from the Imperial College London, held last February at the Institute of Neurosciences of the University of Barcelona. You can read a wee-abstract of the video before watching it: ABSTRACT. Understanding speech in noisy backgrounds requires selective attention…

The Stroop effect: experience it by yourself

In the book that I’m currently reading (“Chronometric explorations of mind” by Micheal Posner) I read about the Stroop task and I thought about sharing here what is the task together with a few thoughts. For those who don’t know, the Stroop task is a classic psychology experiment with a great piece of supporting evidence starting…

The importance of digital detox

Given that during this quarantine (my “quaratinrene“) I’m using my own room to do different tasks (e.g., sleep, meditate, do yoga, work, draw, illustrate, read, watch movies, rest…) I find it really hard to focus on just one task and make a proper task-transition without mind-wandering or thinking about something else. Maybe because of the…

The perfect BSO for working from home

Today I would like to share with you a great music project that has turned out to be my perfect BSO for this working-from-home-quarantine. You might already know it, but I feel that I have to share it with whoever is reading these words. It’s no more than the great concept of RADIO PARADISE! For…

My mental health crisis

I remember that a few years ago a colleague from my research group presented a paper about the mental health crisis in graduate students. By that time I was in the middle of my master’s degree and I didn’t feel like I was in that state to suffer stress and anxiety because of my studies…

Semantic maps in the human brain

The meaning of language is represented in regions of the cerebral cortex known collectively as the “semantic system”. However, little of the semantic system has been mapped comprehensively, and the semantic selectivity of most regions is still unknown. Here we systematically map semantic selectivity across the cerebral cortex using voxel-wise modeling of fMRI data collected…